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Social Media and You

Social Media is at once surreal and extremely real.

On the surreal side, you don’t owe it or any of us anything. Nor does what it gives you count for anything on its own.

On the real side, it is exactly like real life with busy, busy people trying to live their lives as best they can. These people don’t have time for everything or everyone. They have massive personal challenges (that can’t be shared – see my thoughts on surreal). They feel tremendous pressure from an increasingly interconnected yet impersonal world that they hardly recognize.

My tip to artists is to be yourself and share what you do in a real – authentically you – way that is motivated by what motivates the real and authentic you. Just like in real life, most will walk on by, but the right ones will not. And some will follow you anywhere.

Or said in a better and brilliant way by Howard Thurman, “Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive, and go do that, because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”

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Two Kinds of Friends

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There are two kinds of friends.

Those that encourage you by telling you your mess-up wasn’t all that bad. That the test wasn’t fair, the judging was too strict, or the expectations were too high.

And those that tell you yes, you could’ve been better prepared and you should’ve practiced more. What the judge said may have been correct. That you can, and should, do better next time.

Both kinds of friends are nice to have.

You’ll achieve success by listening to the honest ones.
photo credit: .reid. via photopin cc

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Dear Musician, What in the World are You Thinking?

Dear Musician, What in the World are You Thinking?

Yes I know you know it’s a big world out there. But dear musician, have you spent any time considering how and where you fit in? I hope so.

“I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.” – Bill Cosby

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It’s a Big World

  • Where do you want to live?
  • Why?
  • What do you know about the music scene there?
  • Can you make a living as a musician there?
  • How?
  • How much of a living do you need to make to live there?
  • Do you want to travel as part of your music career? Where?
  • Do you want to travel for fun? Where and how much will that cost?
  • Where do other musicians like you live?
  • Should you live in that same place or should you live somewhere else and be unique?
  • Where do fans of what you do live? Do you have to live there too? Do you want to?
  • How can you reach them directly or, how in the world will they find you?

“Life’s a journey, not a destination.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Your Journey

I hope you’ll take the time to consider these and other questions about you and your world. Yes I want you to enjoy the journey, I just want to make sure yours is leading to the destination you truly desire.

About Steve Grossman: Former ACM and Grammy Award winning drummer. Author, teacher, speaker and Dale Carnegie Facilitator. Music career coach and mentor.

Website. Books. Workshops. Twitter.

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Dear Musician, If I Could Say Only One Thing

I spoke to a group of college music majors this past week and it got me thinking about this question. So dear musician, if I could say only one thing to you about succeeding in music, here’s what I’d say.

To get posts like these, bonus content, a free e-book and a 10-part, Your Success in Music course, subscribe to my newsletter here.

You’re Never NOT Marketing

  • See every conversation as an opportunity to build your network that will lead to the work you want.
  • Understand that every gig you take tells the world what kind of career you want. Taking a gig ’cause “it pays great” tells everyone you’ll play anything for money. This is fine if it’s true, but what if you truly want to play on a big rock tour?
  • Always play great. People won’t know or care that you’re having a bad day or don’t care about the music. What they will know is that you’re a bad player and you don’t care about music at all.
  • Dress for the gig all the time.
  • Get around people who are in life where you want to be.
  • Help others get to where they want to be in life.
  • Show up on time or early and be glad to be there.

In other words, be intentional about everything you do and say so that it leads naturally to your music career.

About Steve Grossman: Former ACM and Grammy Award winning drummer. Author, teacher, speaker and Dale Carnegie Facilitator. Music career coach and mentor.

Website. Books. Workshops. Twitter.

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